IMF: US Trade Wars Are Risk to America’s Economy

The U.S. economy could be weakened by escalating trade wars or a sudden downturn in global financial markets, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) warns.

In an annual review of the U.S. economy, the IMF said it was on a 2.6 percent growth track this year, greater than the 2.3 percent growth rate forecast in April.

But the report also said the U.S. economy appears to be increasingly vulnerable amid investor concern over America's trade wars, noting they could trigger worsening global financial conditions.

The IMF criticized U.S. President Donald Trump's administration for efforts to remake global trade relationships through higher tariffs and said it was "especially important" to resolve the trade dispute with China.

The report said the U.S. economy has recovered from the financial crisis that began in 2008, but millions of Americans did not benefit from the recovery. Household income increased a meager 2.2 percent from the end of the last century, the report said, while the U.S. economy expanded 23 percent per capita during the same period.

"The poorest 40 percent of households have a level of net wealth that is lower today than it was in 1983," the report said.

The report called on the Trump administration to avert an economic slowdown by adopting measures to cut public and corporate debt and address inequality.

On Wednesday, the IMF warned the U.S.-China trade war could cut world economic growth next year.

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said Trump's threat to tax all trade between the two countries would shrink the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by one-half-of-one percent.

"This amounts to a loss of about about $455 billion, larger than the size of South Africa's economy," Lagarde said in a briefing note for the Group of Twenty (G-20), a collection of the world's largest advanced and emerging economies. "These are self-inflicted wounds that must be avoided... by removing the recently implemented trade barriers and by avoiding further barriers in whatever form," she added.

The warning came as G-20 finance ministers and central bankers prepare to meet in Japan later this month. They will gather just weeks after U.S.-China talks collapsed amid claims of broken promises and another round of punishing tariffs.

Source: Voice of America